Tag Archive: accessibility


Deaf In Prison

I watched the #Deaf In Prison video from You Tube and I must say I feel dismal  but not surprised..which is unfortunate. You would expect that all citizens have a right to be treated fairly and their basic needs being met such as love, nourishment, clothing( if you desire), shelter and communication. Of course our basic needs over time have grown to a laundry list of items that may or may not be a need but more of a personal desire. However, the items I listed above are common to any individual in the human race.

When thinking of the Deaf community and their basic needs-communication, equal access and civil rights are key to their abilities to thrive in a hearing dominated society. When deaf individuals are deprived of these necessities they are set-up for an uphill battle one that cannot possibly be won.

The documentary clip Deaf In Prison shares experiences that deaf prisoners are facing that are all too common place and should not be. I understand people are responsible for their actions and must face the consequences but in that they remain human beings and require their basic rights while repaying their debt to society.

 

 

Hands Talk Too is all about resources! Here are some deaf news sites to take a look at.

These are independent news reports that shares headlines and deaf related news with the deaf and hard of hearing community. Take a look and sign to receive subscriptions!

 

Click on each name to check out the websites:

Deaf Weekly News

Deaf News

Deaf Newspaper LLC

Deaf News Todaynews

Interesting that across the nation, countries realized the importance to meet the needs of the Deaf community. Even though access and equality have been a slow process it is better late than never along with the continued hope of brighter future.

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International Symbol of Deafness / Hard of Hea...

International Symbol of Deafness / Hard of Hearing This symbol indicates individual(s) who is deaf, hard of hearing, or having some degrees of hearing loss. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Office of Deaf Access is a California Government Department of Social Services program that provides resources to Deaf, Hard of hearing and Hearing communities that work with Deaf. It has a wealth of information and can be of assistance to bridging the gap of information between the deaf and hearing communities.

Office of Deaf Access website: Offers resources for medical professions, education, field officers and employers. As well as hosting a directory for Deaf consumers who are looking for mental health, social services and other programs and a list of service providers for each region.

Retrieved from website 5/1/13:

HISTORY : In 1980, at the urging of California’s deaf community, the California State Legislature and the Governor created the Office of Deaf Access (ODA) to administer the state’s Deaf Access Program (DAP). The DAP was created to ensure that state operated public programs address the communication needs of people who are deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing and late-deafened.

PURPOSE : The ODA has two primary purposes. First, it acts as a liaison between the California Department of Social Services (CDSS) Director’s Office and the deaf community, various programs, agencies, and other organizations concerned with deafness or hearing loss. Second, the ODA provides contract administration and program oversight of CDSS’ contracts with a network of eight, private, non-profit agencies that provide a variety of DAP services to California’s deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing and late-deafened populations.

PUBLICATIONS : The ODA has developed a number of publications that are available for download by clicking on the links provided below. If you are unable to download any of these publications, please contact the ODA and a hard copy can be sent to you. These three brochures are designed to provide American Sign Language assistance in specific communication situations.

Hello Everyone !

It has been some time since my last post. I apologize but  life simply happened and I have been so busy. My students are preparing for their first ASL showcase, we are signing stories at the local library and I have been attending common core training. Too many things too little time…smile.                                                              travel

This week’s post is about travel resources for the deaf community where hearing people are welcomed too.

Last week, my class learned vacation themed signs and that Deaf people enjoy going on vacation  and types of accommodations they should have rather in a hotel or airport. One of the main concerns deaf individuals may have at times is accessibility and receiving information given to travelers on cruises, flights, tours and other travel. I gave them an  homework assignment  to look for deaf friendly travel agencies  that include resources and accommodations for the deaf, other important services, destinations and contact information.

One of my students researched The Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) this act sets requirements for disability access at airports and airlines. Great idea! I will give some information on the ACT.

1. Prohibits U.S. and foreign airlines from discriminating on passengers based on disability

2. requires Airlines, facilities and services accessible to passengers with disabilities

3. Require airlines to take steps to accommodate passengers with a disability.

Key information:

1. Passengers must let airline personnel know they are deaf, hard of hearing or deaf blind and the services they will need.

2. The airline must make information available through text or the best resource for the passenger.

3. Service Animals are permitted

4.Safety Assistants are permitted to travel with people who are deaf-blind

5.All televisions must have caption in the airport

Hotels, Motels and other like businesses ADA requirements: This law applies to all lodging (except for  buildings in which the owner lives and that have five or fewer rooms for rent)

1. Must provide auxiliary services when necessary to ensure communication, unless it would result in an undue burden or fundamental alteration. Auxiliary services can be an interpreter , computer-aided transcription services, written materials, amplified headset, open and closed captioning telephones compatible with hearing aids, video texts displays or other effective methods. No charge can be given for this.

2.Hotels and other lodging must be installed audio and visual  flashing fire/smoke alarms, doorbell lights, electrical outlet for TTY use near telephones, can provide assistive listening devices.

If you need to file a complaint you can contact: http://www.ada.gov/t3compfm.htm

Summer will be here soon are you looking for a Deaf friendly travel agency???? Here are some resources they found below:

www.greatdeafvacations.com

www.handsontvl.com

www.ncl.com

www.kerstinsdeaftravel.com

www.passagesdeaftravel.com

www.disabledholidaydirectory.co.uk

travel 2Happy Travel!