Category: Deaf Community


help images

Help, I need somebody,
Help, not just anybody,
Help, you know I need someone, help! The Beatles – Help! Lyrics

As a teacher every now and then we may teach topics we may not know the technical term for but we now what we are teaching and how to teach it. Sometimes, I will teach a topic and someone will ask if I teach a certain topic or make a comment on the topic I teach and when they use the technical term..I think oh yes that is what is called. My motto is I am always learning and I seek to learn something new as often as possible therefore I am in a constant learning process. What I think I know…. I don’t and what I think I don’t know…I do, odd how that works. However, I know that I know I want to always put my best effort forth and when I am not familiar with a topic I am going to research or ask for help until I get an  answer I understand. Therefore, I was introduced to these four topics some of the topic I knew already and the others I did some research to make sure I understood and now I want other educators, native signers or those knowledgable about linguistics to shed some light. If you could give definitions and examples of how you use this in content, that would be great!

These are 4 topics : Classifiers; Discourse Analysis; Register and ASL Sentence Types. 

Thankyou for your help and feedback!

“Sometimes the questions are complicated and the answers are simple.” – Dr. Seuss

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What are your thoughts?

Video provided through Ohlone College Deaf Studies Division

How do you Treat Deaf People with Psychological Disorders?.

 

 

This is a great piece about treating deaf people with psychological disorders. I formerly worked for Department of Social Services and one of the most difficult aspects of providing mental health services to the deaf community is the inability to find providers who can use direct communication in sign language and the lack of cultural awareness to meet the needs of deaf patients. All sessions normally include the provider, patient and sign language interpreter. Sometimes along the way information can be changed because of vocabulary, concept or expression. There have also been instances where a mental health provider does not understand the function of a sign language interpreter or cannot understand how confidentiality clauses work with using an interpreter. There are very few mental health providers that are fluent in sign language and are very uncommon which makes them difficult to locate. It would be great like this author said if providers who have a large number of deaf patients learn information about deaf culture and sign language to better treat their patients. What would be fabulous is if more people became mental health providers that are fluent in sign. I encourage my students to not only focus on interpreting as a career choice but to be fluent signers who become speech pathologists, doctors/nurses, social workers, mental health counselors/psychologists or whatever their desire but always consider how they can incorporate ASL into their field or consider  a field where there is a need in the deaf community.

Thankyou Philippa Berry author of IL SE INTERIOR-THE INNER SELF blog for a great post

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During a trip to Sacramento, CA I visited the Capitol building and as I walked through the hallway I noticed artwork by students ranging from elementary to high school. One artwork category I noticed is “The Best Part of Me”. Students shared how they thought their hair, eyes or smile was the best part of them however; one student in particular said his ear was the best part of him because it allowed him to hear. Sometimes I think our world focuses so much on deaf vs.hearing, culturally deaf vs. medically deaf, signing vs. oral but the important thing is being proud of who you are. This artwork posting reminded me of what is important..just being yourself.

I am happy this little guy is proud of his hearing and his hearing aid. If he ever read this I would say kudos for sharing this with everyone and being proud of yourself and know that you are wonderfully made!

Peace Corps Director Ronald Tschetter observes...

Peace Corps Director Ronald Tschetter observes deaf students on his visit to Kenya. The students are using role playing exercises, educational videos, and other visual aids that Peace Corps Volunteers have developed, including Kenya’s first uniform sign language poster, the “Easy to Learn Sign Language Poster.” Peace Corps Press Release. “Peace Corps Director Visits Kenya and Unique Deaf Education Program .” June 26, 2007. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Academics in Deaf education have always been a highly discussed topic. The concern is rather residential schools (schools for the Deaf) truly prepare deaf students at the same rate as their hearing counterpart. The other side if that coin is rather or not public (hearing) schools put effort forth in educating the deaf that attend their schools through on campus deaf and hard of hearing cohort or mainstreamed programs. If you toss in an additional coin the other concern is should the focus of deaf education be on vocational and life skills training to ensure students are functioning in a hearing society. The last side of the coin is for everything else in between.
The benefits for Schools for the Deaf is the school is tailored to meet the needs of the students as a whole; socially, personally, academically and vocational. Students are taught in their primary language which enables a better foundation for learning and increase complex concepts that may be difficult to clarify in English. Teachers are knowledgeable and specialize in Deaf education and have the best strategies on how to teach the deaf. Students are able to see Deaf adults as role models like themselves which encourages them to not limit themselves. Students live with others like themselves who have the same method of communication and similar struggles, they can communicate to support each other through the challenges they face. Schools for the Deaf are great for helping a child identify with their “deafhood” and be proud to be Deaf with a Capitol “D”. The drawbacks of a school like this is it can be sheltering because students live in the deaf world on an ongoing basis. It can be biased in the methods and content taught. Some educators outside the deaf community think students are not being prepared for the real world or college academics because of the lack of information students receive.
The benefits of students attending a mainstreamed program in a hearing public school is they are learning the same content their hearing counterparts are learning. They have access to resources to support their learning such as an interpreter or a note taker. Most importantly to some is that they are learning to function in a hearing environment and are not sheltered in a small world that can help them to exist in a larger world. I have met parents who say they solely chose mainstream programs because they want their children to learn to function in a hearing world. The disability-the lack of hearing will inhibit them from getting jobs and pursuing higher academics if they don’t learn how to communicate with hearing individuals and they feel mainstreamed programs support that. The drawbacks of a mainstreamed program is if the program is not well established with knowledgable teachers, interpreters and administrators deaf students may fall through the cracks if they dn not have advocates putting place best practices and programs for them. Also, regular administrators, teachers and support staff have no idea of how best to help the student besides general concepts like an Assistive Listening device or sitting the student in front of the class room.
There are pros and cons to both environments but what it comes down to is, which is the best environment for the student with the family desires taking a back seat. Which environment will the student be inspired, educated and grow in? This is what a parent should be looking for. Education is a partnership between the parent and the school. In addition, parents should support the student inside school by learning information to advocate on behalf of their child and outside of school by learning sign language to communicate with their child. I believe it is best to have  a combination of both academic and vocational education in any setting students attend. Both of these components will help to build a healthy and succesful student who will become a healthy and successful adult.

Beautiful Video

sponsored by the Alumni Association and co-hosted by the Old Farts Racing Team                       

Presents:

Happy Days Reunion Annual Benefit Car Show and Craft Fair

Saturday

March 30, 2013

8:30-3:00pm

Spectator Admission is free!

Flyer attached for more information.

CSDRAAFLYERFinal.pdf_2013a_b

car 2  car

Toddlers signing in-car is amazing and sooo heart warming. These two boys are signing their little hearts out! It’s funny because these toddlers can sign better than some of the high school students sitting in my class everyday (I do have some great high school signers)! Sign Language is a beautiful and expressive language and these toddlers clearly demonstrate it and remind us signers as to why we love ASL so much!

Exposure and information can be the key to feeling  more comfortable and accepting to what you as hearing parents and your deaf child may experience. This is a great video sharing perspectives of hearing parents that have deaf children. The video was created two years ago by University of Northridge. This university has a degree program dedicated to Deaf Studies/Education and has a large deaf population attending to obtain degrees. If you are a parent of a deaf child please view the video to gain more insight to American Sign Language and Deaf culture and more so to see the world through your child’s eyes.