Archive for May, 2013


Nederlands: Monogram van studentenclub Carpe Diem

Nederlands: Monogram van studentenclub Carpe Diem (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Carpe Diem

 The enjoyment of the pleasures of the moment without concern for the future

To “seize the day” and/or a certain moment in time.

To put aside all differences, all fears, all worries, and just go for it.

To make the most out of that part of time

Live your life to the full

Be spontaneous

Go for it

Last night was the ASL showcase for my program. Both the students and I have been working persistently to produce a worthy showcase for parents, fellow students/teachers and (drum roll) our primary focus the Deaf community. Well, the show seemed to be a success (grin from ear to ear)!!! There was an overwhelming vibe of positivity, support and well wishing from the audience. At the end of the performance encouraging feedback and future commitments were shared with both students and I. From the moment we began the show to the moment we turned lights off we seized the moments. I put my hands in the air and waved them like I just didn’t care and enjoyed the energy from the crowd and my students. I almost felt like a rock star and so did they.My students had to stop me several times to remind me to do a quick dance, or shake off the stress or to look at what we had accomplished as I ran in circles at the event make sure all needs were meet (even though I had a great team taking care of everything, I could not let go).  Finally I stopped and joined the festivities. Last night, the lesson learned is the importance  of seizing the day….there is not one minute, hour, moment or day that can be returned. I know there are so many phases or clichés people use casually and without thought such as “live like there is no tomorrow” well that’s hard to do when you are trying to get through today and who has time to think about tomorrow. However, when we take a moment to smell the roses you we can see how much we have missed in that minute, hour, moment or day and I’m not sure how you feel but for me it’s too much. I want to stay connected, I want to smell the coral colored roses (enthusiasm/passion) most of all I want to seize the day in any way I can.

What does seize the day look like in my life?

1. Stop and make myself laugh

2. Do a dance I havent in a long time

3. Change the scenery by going for a quick walk or sitting in a garden

4. Telling myself everything I love about me and my life

5. Enjoy my favorite song

6. Doing something out of the ordinary

7. Tell a stranger something good about them

8. Wear my favorite color as much as I can (brown)

9. Remember that I am who I am and being me is good enough

Are you living  or existing? How do you seize the day?

Great video form Ted.com that talk about body language. View and share your thoughts.

 

Body Language

English: A collection of pictograms. Three of ...

English: A collection of pictograms. Three of them used by the United States National Park Service. A package containing those three and all NPS symbols is available at the Open Icon Library (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It seems odd that I would ask this type of question especially with my background but very often people ask me is deafness a disability? Or is it a handicap? Or both?

My answer is that Deaf (Big D) individuals do not see it as a disability nor handicap but instead a unique way of life and a culture bonded by a common language. Deaf individuals do not focus on what they cannot do but what they can do- this would the disability vs. ability perspective. Hearing individuals tend to focus on the limitations associated with deafness until they are introduced to the “can do” perspective of a deaf person.

The hearing communities and deaf organizations have established programs and resources for deaf individuals to have equal access, resources and opportunities to be successful and a productive citizen in society based on what may be perceived as a disability. On average deaf individuals appreciate and utilize the resources and opportunities provided but they take advantage of the offers not because they feel and agree with the disabled perspective but to use the resources to accomplish goals, to advance and to thrive.

According to www.ehow.com

Disability Defined
  • According to the World  Health Organization, a  disability is “any restriction or lack (resulting from any impairment) of  ability to perform an activity in the manner or within the range considered  normal for a human being.”

Handicap Defined

The World Health Organization’s definition of a handicap is the “loss or  limitation of opportunities to take part in the life of the community on an  equal level with others; encounter a person with disability and social,  physical environment. Is an inability to accomplish something one might want to  do. The term emphasize the focus on shortcomings in the environment and in many  tasks and activities, ex. in education, occupation, information or communication  (social dimension).”Read more:  Difference Between Disability & Handicap | eHow http://www.ehow.com/facts_6141081_difference-between-disability-handicap.html#ixzz2TQ7D4Ymx

According to www.wisegeek.com

Impairment: occurs when there is a problem that affects the normal human body structure or organ.

Disability: refers to the way in which the impairment restricts the movements and activities of the individual.

Handicap: stems from the extent of restriction that the impairment and disability impose on the individual. The criteria for measuring the handicap is by assessing how other normal people in such a situation would cope. http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-difference-between-impairment-disability-and-handicap.htm

 

All that being said, which there is more to the Disability vs. handicap topic, how do you define each and what do you think the difference is and which applies to the deaf ? Maybe your perspective is that neither applies to the community.

What are your thoughts respectively shared:)

My wonderful students have been practicing and planning an ASL Showcase. Students will perform acts, skits and songs that are translated into Sign Language. You do not need to be fluent in ASL to enjoy the show, only have a willingness to have fun and experience something new.

The event will take place at:

Redlands High School

"A-S-L" signed with American Sign La...

“A-S-L” signed with American Sign Language, combined Image:Sign language A.svg, Image:Sign language S.svg and Image:Sign language L.svg (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

840 East Citrus Avenue

Redlands, CA 92374

Clock Auditorium

6-8pm

Entrance fee of $5.00 at the door

The showcase will include a raffle, vendors and great snacks.

imagesCA8QPK11During this week, a local reporter and photographer interviewed myself and some of my students for  a story for the Redlands Daily Facts newspaper. It was such a great opportunity and experience for me and the students. We were able to share about the wonderful events and learning experiences we are involved in and the difference we are seeking to make in ourselves, school campus and the hearing and deaf communities. We landed a space on the front cover of the newspaper and on the 3rd page of another newspaper titled The Sun.

So often it seems that the positive in the world goes unheard or is ignored to pay attention to the negative going on in the world. This articles highlights some of the positive that happens daily in my classroom and how students apply what they learn in outside of class.

On a personal note, I felt good to be able to share my passion for deaf culture and American Sign Language and how the topic I teach has made a difference to some students that are connected with the class. It also gave me a bit of inspiration to hang in there because sometimes as a teacher we are at the very bottom of the totem pole for recognition and at the very top of the totem pole for blame. This article along with a select group of students reminded me of the short-term and long-term rewards of teaching. To see a students smile because they were able to sign to a deaf person, to read a report about how learning  ASL has changed their life, to hear about the college or career the student selected just because it involves Sign Language and to simply feel the passion a student shows because of how connected they are to the topic. For these experiences I am grateful to simply be an educator.

A link to the article is below, enjoy:)

Silent World Gains A Voice

imagesCAUCQE2C

imagesCAB1NI2Q

International Symbol of Deafness / Hard of Hea...

International Symbol of Deafness / Hard of Hearing This symbol indicates individual(s) who is deaf, hard of hearing, or having some degrees of hearing loss. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Office of Deaf Access is a California Government Department of Social Services program that provides resources to Deaf, Hard of hearing and Hearing communities that work with Deaf. It has a wealth of information and can be of assistance to bridging the gap of information between the deaf and hearing communities.

Office of Deaf Access website: Offers resources for medical professions, education, field officers and employers. As well as hosting a directory for Deaf consumers who are looking for mental health, social services and other programs and a list of service providers for each region.

Retrieved from website 5/1/13:

HISTORY : In 1980, at the urging of California’s deaf community, the California State Legislature and the Governor created the Office of Deaf Access (ODA) to administer the state’s Deaf Access Program (DAP). The DAP was created to ensure that state operated public programs address the communication needs of people who are deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing and late-deafened.

PURPOSE : The ODA has two primary purposes. First, it acts as a liaison between the California Department of Social Services (CDSS) Director’s Office and the deaf community, various programs, agencies, and other organizations concerned with deafness or hearing loss. Second, the ODA provides contract administration and program oversight of CDSS’ contracts with a network of eight, private, non-profit agencies that provide a variety of DAP services to California’s deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing and late-deafened populations.

PUBLICATIONS : The ODA has developed a number of publications that are available for download by clicking on the links provided below. If you are unable to download any of these publications, please contact the ODA and a hard copy can be sent to you. These three brochures are designed to provide American Sign Language assistance in specific communication situations.